SCALE–means letting a photo be big and small at the same time

dunerunsm

In order for a photograph with SCALE to work, you need something of immediate interest like the figure in the foreground kicking up sand as she runs. Then you also need to have a wide background that puts the figure in context. Here it’s the dunes and the ocean in the background. Not enough! You also need points of interest in that broad background. Notice the shadow of the runner. Notice the second smaller figure in the distance. Notice the mystery–the question of “what’s really going on?” All of those element add to the overall composition and not all of them are visual. The mystery is only visual in the sense of wondering how all of this works as a setting.

I don’t do a lot of photographs that feature scale. They’re hard. I think this one works. What do you think?

Photo Accepted in Poughkeepsie New York Show

It’s been a good year so far–lots of my photos going to shows. Wish I was going with them!!!

This is a photo that I’ve had success with before. It’s been in a couple of previous shows. It was taken in a swimming pool and gets it drama–it’s appearance of walking on water–from the fact that I flipped it. It was actually shot with her laying in the water on her side. See image below. Hope you agree that it’s less dramatic that way. How a photo is presented can make a difference.

I like color photos, in general, but lately I’ve taken some photos that are best in black and white. This one, for example.

walkonwaterwebside

 

Fine Art Nude #2

Although this is a color digital shot, I thought it printed best as a classic black and white photograph.

What makes this a good photo? I think it’s the connection between the two models and the fact that they are both focused on something off to the left of the frame which creates both compositional interest and a sense of spontaneity.

What else do I like? The sense of motion, as if they might be moving rather than posed. In fact, the direction was for the models to both move continuously as if in slow motion, in-and-out, back-and-forth. I often give that kind of direction because it avoids the static, posed composition. That also means I have to work to catch the right moment rather than setting something up. As any photographer will tell you, every additional person adds additional complications. It’s twice as hard to get a good photo with two models as with one.

Digital camera; studio set-up, two-lights.

This one is called Hanna and Friend. It can be printed large but my preference is smaller 10 x 12 with a wide white matt and silver frame. It is in a series of 25. This is new work, and the series is just released–25 of the 25 are still available.

I think this one would work well hung in a smaller space like a hallway.

Fine Art Nude #1

This is the icon image at Homo Sapiens Unadorned.

Title: Maskatude

What makes it a worthwhile image? The unexpected, comic attitude.

I especially like the way the photo makes the viewer look twice–those vacant eyes between backwards ears. The hand is also nice, including the shadow of the upper hand. I also like the movement. That butt wants to swing, a nice contrast to the straight, expressionless mask.

The photo was shot in a studio with two lights. Camera is Nikon D90–digital. It was handheld. Except for suggesting she put the mask on backwards, there was very little direction. Model was dancing to music. My job was to catch the right moment.

The print required very little work in Photoshop and has been shown as large as 18 inches by 29 inches (matted size 28 inches by 40 inches) There are 2o remaining in an edition of 25.

It has shown at Camera Obscura in Denver.

Decorating tip: a room where music is played.