Group Shoots

I frequently shoot with several other photographers. We share the cost of the models and studio or travel. I like shooting that way. Means I can work with the model for a few minutes and then let someone else take over while I think about my next set-up or what I want to shoot before the time is up. Less pressure.

I know others who hate working this way. They don’t like having other photographers around. They find it distracting or worry that they will get photos that look like everyone else’s photos. That last one has never been a problem for me. I can shoot shoulder to shoulder with someone and never get the same shot. A slight difference in angle, equipment and eye can make a huge difference in what is actually captured.

This photo of a group shoot in South Dakota is fun because part of the group is off working with hay bales while myself and the photographer in the foreground are setting up a different shot. I took the picture because it was one of those “you have to be there” moments. If I tried to describe that scene . . .

Better to just grab a photo of it.

Doug Beasley Workshop in South Dakota

Just returned from a Doug Beasley workshop in South Dakota.

We took back roads through washouts and gumbo (mud that looks dry but will sink car up to floorboards). We stopped at sites sacred to local Lakota. We ate prime rib at a gas station—it’s the special on Saturday night in a place where the other dinner choice is awful pizza in a bar. Oh, and we also took photos of nudes in the environment. All of it was fun. Even the awful pizza had it’s charm. Boulder Colorado, where I live, is a foodie town. Sometimes I need to be reminded that not all food is “fresh and organic and uptight.”

I’m including a photo by Doug Beasley to show what I was aspiring to produce. My own efforts will follow. Check out Doug Beasley’s website. Check out Circle View Guest Ranch–where we stayed.

Learned a lot. Came home dirty. Had fun.

If you can take the class–offered once a year–do it. Doug Beasley is deep. He’ll inspire with poetry and presence. After taking a class that was mostly about critiques of my work, this one was pleasantly pleasant and just as helpful.

Here’s an example of Doug Beasley’s work:

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Karin Rosenthal Class on Cape Cod

If you get a chance to take a class from Karin Rosenthal–DO IT. If you get a chance to take a second class in a different place, DO IT. These are opportunities not to be missed.

I have been fortunate enough to take two classes from her. The latest was on Cape Cod, working mostly in ponds and forests in that area.

Here’s a photo of Rosenthal working with a model next to a lake, typical of one of her classes.

Her classes offer scenery–usually water. Great models. AND more important, a chance to have her critique your photographs. She takes that seriously. Sometimes she can be blunt! She wants nothing but the best to emerge from the photographers that she works with. That is the reason her classes are worthwhile. You grow as a photographer because she cares about photography–hers, yours, everyone’s. That is what makes her a good teacher, a generous one.

She regularly teaches classes in Vermont and on Cape Cod every summer. She is based in Boston. Check her website www.krosenthal.com

Here’s a photo that I took in her class. One of many that I like.

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